A story how challenges and hardships make you strong

An eight-year-old boy went to his grandfather and proudly announced,
“I am going to be very successful when I grow up. Can you give me any tips on how to get there?”

The grandfather nodded, and without saying a word, took the boy by the hand and walked him to a nearby plant nursery.

There, the two of them chose and purchased two small saplings.

They returned home and planted one of them in the back yard.

The other sapling was placed in a pot and kept indoors.

“Which one do you think will be the most successful in the future?” asked the grandfather.

The boy thought for a moment and said, “The indoor tree.
It’s protected and safe while the outdoor one has to cope with the elements.”

The grandfather shrugged his shoulders and said, “We’ll see.”

The grandfather carefully tended to both plants and in a few years,
the boy, now a teenager came to visit.

“You never really answered my question from when I was a young boy.
How can I become successful when I grow up?” he asked.

The old man showed the teenager the indoor tree and then took him
outside to have a look at the towering tree outside.

“Which one is bigger?” the grandfather asked.

“The outside one. But that doesn’t make sense,
it has to cope with many more challenges than the inside one.”

The grandfather smiled, “Yes, but the risk of dealing with challenges is worth it as it has the freedom to spread its roots wide and its leaves towards the heavens.
Boy, remember this and you be successful in whatever you do; If you choose the safe option all of your life you will never grow and be all that you can be, but if you are willing to face the world head-on with all of its dangers and challenges, the sky’s the limit.”

The young man looked up at the tall tree, took a deep breath and nodded his head,
knowing that his wise grandfather was right.

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10 Signs Someone Is Smarter Than You

Unless you think you’re the smartest, who doesn’t want to be smarter? Of course I want to be smarter too, so I try to find out who’s the real smart guy that maybe I can learn from. James Gardner has got me an answer on Quoraabout whether someone’s smart or not.

Here are the signs of smart people:

1. They don’t talk as much as you do, because they know they got smart by listening.

2. They know lots of things other than what they’re specialised in. Theirs is the gift of a broad mind, constantly fed with the stimulant of being interested in what everyone else is doing.

3. They juggle home, work and personal interests with dexterity and never fall back on the tired old refrain about “work life balance”. And when they’re juggling, they somehow manage to seem 100% engaged with what they’re doing, on all fronts simultaneously, even though you know they’re taking appropriate steps behind the scenes to make sure their lives are perfectly, serenely balanced.

4. They probably do social media. Not always, but probably. It is not only another chance to listen, but one they use to ensure they can feed their brains with things they otherwise won’t have come across.

5. Even when things go very badly wrong, they’ll be smiling. Smart people never get ruffled because their smart brains present them with alternatives faster than the bad stuff can happen.

6. They know they are usually the smartest person in the room, but they don’t spend their time dwelling on that. Instead, they take it as a personal challenge to see if they can make everyone else the smartest person in the room too.

7. If they are managers, they will make every effort to get people smarter, more connected and more popular than them in their teams. They’re not threatened because they know that smartness is synergistic. They also make sure that their smart people get to look smarter than them for the same reason.

8. They have hidden skills that never get rolled out until they’re needed. They don’t have any need to show their full capabilities for reasons of proving they’re better than others.

9. They may or may not have expensive educations. You’d never know just by being with them unless you had their CV in front of you.

10. They never, ever, under any circumstances, make you look stupid, even though it would be easy to do so. They’ve learned through bitter experience that the only thing that happens when you make someone look bad is you look bad yourself.

Now you should know who the smart people are. If you want to be the smart one, let me give you this extra advice from Steve Jobs “Stay hungry. Stay foolish.”

Dad is always a DAD!

A girl was with her father when she saw her boyfriend coming

GIRL: Have you come to collect your book titled “DADDY IS AT HOME?” by Ngozi Okafor
BOY: No, I want that your hymns book called “WHERE SHOULD I WAIT FOR YOU?”

GIRL: I don’t have that one but may be you should take the other one titled “UNDER THE MANGO
TREE” by Chimamanda Adichie
BOY: Fine, but don’t forget to bring “I WILL CALL YOU IN 5 MINUTES” while coming to school

GIRL: I will also bring you a new one too titled”I WON’T LET YOU DOWN” by Chinua Achebe

Then;

DAD: Those books are too many, will he read them all
GIRL: Yes dad, he is very smart intelligent

DAD: Okay don’t forget to give him the one on the table titled “I AM NOT STUPID, I UNDERSTOOD
EVERYTHING YOU’VE BEEN SAYING” by Shakespeare!

13 Possible Reasons Why Your Memory is Letting You Down

You walk into the kitchen only to realize you have no idea why you’re there, forget the name of someone you just met, start driving only to realize you forgot how to get to where it is that you’re going. Such lapses are usually attributed to an overload of information, but from time to time, other things hinder your ability to remember. Here are the 13 most common causes of memory lapses.

1. Vitamin B12 Deficiency
Similarly to iron, B12 aids in the creation of red blood cells, reduces lethargy and the risk of anemia, and improves vital memory processes. A recent study found that Vitamin B12 deficiency may result in erratic memory.

The research found that B12 works as a protective layer for myelin – the substance that coats our nerves. When there isn’t enough B12 in your system, the layer is not thick enough and gets damaged. This damage slows down nerve impulses, which can also lead to memory lapses.

B12 deficiency can be caused by old age – the older we get, our stomach secretes less acid, making it harder for our bodies to absorb nutrients from food. Another cause can be unhealthy diet choices, Anemia, and Crohn’s disease. B12 is most common in fish, meat, and dairy, so consult your doctor about the best source of B12 for you.

2. High Blood Pressure
If you’re under 45 and tend to be “forgetful”, you may want to test your blood pressure. In a research conducted at the University of Alabama, it was found that people who have higher blood pressure tend to suffer from memetic lapses, as well as a decrease in cognitive skills, when compared to people with normal blood pressure.

High blood pressure damages the inner walls of the arteries, causing them to tear and form scar tissue, which hardens the arteries. Harder arteries allow less blood to travel through them, reducing the amount needed for the brain to function properly, and may lead to memory problems.

The good news is that a healthy diet, physical exercise and weight loss can help reduce the risk of such arterial hardening.

3. Hypothyroidism
If you’re tired, gaining weight, feeling depressed and your memory is on the fritz, you may be suffering from hypothyroidism.

Hypothyroidism often occurs slowly and gradually, lowering the levels of the hormone thyroxine (T4), which has a critical role in our body’s energy production. Low T4 causes a slower metabolism and slower cognitive functions, causing lapses in memory.

Common causes of hypothyroidism can be autoimmune diseases such as Hashimoto’s, where the body attacks itself. Alternatively, viral infections and even abuse of antibiotics may also induce hypothyroidism.

4. Menopause
A common theory that makes the connection between forgetfulness and menopause with women was recently corroborated. Research conducted by the University of California confirms that as estrogen levels dwindle, memory lapses tend to occur. Estrogen protects neurotransmitters, and without it, they become less efficient. Such cases can be treated with HRT.

5. Migraines
If you suffer from migraines, you may be at risk of suffering from Transient Global Amnesia (TGA) in your 50’s. TGA is a state where a person cannot recall events from the previous day, cannot remember where they are or how they got there while still remembering who they are and who other people are.
It is customary to see this type of amnesia as a result of a genetic flaw, leading to a spread of nerve impulses in the brain. TGA can temporarily paralyze the memory, and just like migraines, can be triggered by sudden immersion in hot or cold water, extreme emotional distress, or even sexual intercourse. Luckily, TGA is not very common, rarely occurs more than once in a lifetime and is reversible.

6. Long Flights
Long flights can leave us exhausted and weary. These symptoms are usually caused by inconsistent sleep patterns, as well as jet lag.

Research conducted at the University of California showed that the feeling of drowsiness, memory lapses and the difficulty in processing information can extend for quite some time after the flight, and even after the feelings of jet lag have passed. When we sleep, our hippocampus processes our memories, so not enough sleep can cause memory lapses.

7. Pregnancy
Pregnant women are often stigmatized as having bad memory, but in recent research conducted in Australia, researchers compared the performance of pregnant vs. non-pregnant women. The results were conclusive – pregnant women under-performed in memory-related tasks when compared to their non-pregnant counterparts. Researchers hypothesized that the reasons are the changes in lifestyle and diet.

8. Chemotherapy
Another unpleasant side effect of chemotherapy is memory loss, often referred to as chemo-brain by patients.
The chemotherapy can affect the way brain cells function, as shown in a Stanford University study that showed how women who undergo chemotherapy for breast cancer also suffered memory lapses when compared with those who did not engage in chemotherapy.

This is usually a reversible situation, and memory functions return to normal once chemo is concluded, but in some cases the improvement takes years. Taking aspirin, which increases the blood flow to the brain, can be a good way to prevent or treat “chemo brain”, but you should first consult with your oncologist.

9. Anesthesia
When undergoing major operations, anesthesia is often the only way a patient can go through the procedure without suffering major trauma. The downside is possible memory loss and reduced cognitive functions in the days following the operation. The University of Florida found that about 40% of patients who were over 60, suffered from memory loss after an operation, and 12.7% suffered serious cognitive problems in the following 3 months.

10. Epilepsy
Epilepsy is a type of “short circuit” in the brain, causing seizures, and affects over 50 million people worldwide. During an episode, electrical impulses in the brain get redirected, leading to problems such as temporary loss of motor skills, loss of cognitive function and, memory loss.

11. Arthritis and Asthma Medication
Corticosteroids are steroids the body produces, and can be taken as treatment of asthma and arthritis. Intake of high doses for a duration of six months or more may lead to memory problems.
Despite being a rare occurrence, corticosteroids can actually kill brain cells and cause cerebral atrophy in the hippocampus, in particular. Changing the dosage can help, but your physician should be consulted with regards to other possible side effects.

12. Depression
Depression is associated with low levels of chemicals in the brain, such as serotonin or norepinephrine. These chemicals can affect memory-related processes in the brain. Antidepressants and/or psychological treatment can help with memory problems.

13. Excessive Alcohol Consumption
The more alcohol you consume, the less capable your brain is of storing short term memories. Alcohol affects the hippocampus, reducing its functions, including the formation of new memories, which is why we sometimes forget what we did after we drink.
Long-term alcohol abuse can lead to Korsakoff’s syndrome, where the ability to form short-term memories is lost, making it difficult to recall recent information.

A slow, controlled rehabilitation can stop the process of memory loss for at least 25% of patients.

Men will be Men

Masterpiece!!
A guy was baptized and dipped in water 3 times.
After the third dip, the Priest said: “You are now baptized, you are a new creation. The old one is gone, no more drinking of alcohol for you. Your new name is Gomes.”

Gomes went back home and headed straight for the fridge. He took a Kingfisher Beer, dipped it in water 3 times and said: “You are now a new creation, the old one is gone. Your new name is Green Tea!” 😂😆

Men will be men …

8 Very Healthy and Very Tasty Tropical Fruit!

We’re used to hearing that tasty and healthy rarely go together, but these tropical fruit easily prove otherwise. In rain forests and tropical climates around the world grow treasures rich in both nutrients and taste – meet 8 easy to come by exotic fruit that really pack a healthy punch!
Remember: Consume these fruit in their raw form, not as dried fruit (high in sugar) or as canned.

Asai
This fruit comes to us straight from the Amazonas area and was brought to the rest of the world by hikers from other countries. The asai is a type of palm tree with a small purple fruit that is considered a ‘antioxidant bomb’. The extremely high level of antioxidants the asai contains have made it a very sought after anti-aging tool, in addition to its exotic taste. Additionally, the asai is a fruit that is rich in protein and contains Omega 6 and Omega 9 fatty acids. Due to its low sugar content, it is also safe for diabetes patients to eat.

Guava
The guava mainly grows in the Caribbeans and the nations of South and Central America. In addition to vitamins, potassium and fiber, the guava is also a rich source of potassium, an element needed for a variety of biological processes in the body. The guava contains anti-bacterial materials as well as substances that lower the blood sugar levels. It is also known to relax clenched muscles and aids the digestive system.

Mango
The mango may not be so exotic in all places, but it originally comes from the rain forests of India and China. other tropical fruit, the mango is rich in vitamins A and C, potassium and fiber, as well as antioxidants. The mango fruit also contains a lot of iron, crucial for burning energy and every action the body takes. Almost every part of the mango tree can be used for medicinal purposes.

Carambola
This wax-textured, star shaped fruit is not very common, but can still be found in specialized fruit shops. It comes from the tropical climates of South East Asia. Each fruit is about 40 calories and is a great source of vitamin C essential for the immune system, especially during the winter, as well as a fantastic source of vitamin A, which is known to improve sight and skin function.

Kiwi
The hairy fruit with the sweet sour taste comes from South China. The kiwi is among the fruit with the highest Vitamin C content in the world, twice more than oranges. It is a great source of magnesium, essential for the heart and blood systems, and also a fat-free source of vitamin E, which is rare in fruit. It is also known as a great natural remedy for the flu and the various parts of the plant (including the fruit), aid in the battle against joint pain, kidney stones and various types of cancer.

Papaya
From Central America comes this beautiful orange fruit, packed full of great nutrients. It has a unique enzyme called papain which helps to disassemble protein and helps in renewing tissue. In traditional Chinese medicine, the papaya is a remedy for constipation. It also contains a lot of folic acid, which helps keep our DNA, bone marrow and blood cells intact.

Passionfruit (aka passiflora)
This fruit has become more popular in recent years, and some even grow it in their back yard for its vitamin A and C content , for its potassium levels and its fiber. It is only about 16 calories a fruit and is known to have great relaxation effects, and so we recommend eating it before sleep to treat insomnia. It is also chock full of antioxidants.

Pineapple
Many of the others on this list, the pineapple originally comes from the tropical areas of South America – mainly Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay. The pineapple also contains a lot of vitamin A and C, but what’s special about it is the bromelain – an enzyme that has strong anti-bacterial properties and is essential to the digestive system. It is even used in mainstream medicine, but is best taken directly from raw food.

This Super Fruit Can Reduce Your Risk of Heart Disease

Keeping the heart healthy is a primary concern for us all, but it isn’t always an easy thing to do. Despite increased, widespread understanding of its dangers and causes, heart disease remains the biggest killer in the western world, accounting for 1 in 4 adult deaths in the USA every year. For this reason, scientists continue to search for new ways to treat and prevent the problem. Some of these studies find that the key to prevention can be found in the kitchen, not the medicine cabinet. And now recent research has suggested that one super fruit could prevent and even help reverse the rate that fatty acids build up in the arteries, which is a common cause of heart attacks and strokes.
Here’s how the pomegranate could be your new best defense against heart disease.

Fatty Acids the Arteries
The arteries are blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart to other parts of the body as part of the circulatory system. They are vital for sustaining life and the human body cannot function unless they are in good health. However, over time, our arteries can become clogged with cholesterol, fat and other materials which begin to line the vessel walls.
As this layer of material becomes thicker, it also begins to harden. This combination forces the arteries to become more narrow, meaning blood cannot pass through as easily, putting more stress on the heart which has to pump harder to force more blood through. If left untreated, the blockages can close the arteries altogether, causing a heart attack.

How Can Pomegranates Help?
Recent studies have suggested that pomegranates could have a remarkable ability to reduce the progressive thickening of the coronary arteries by these fatty acids. Here we will have a look at the findings, as well as some other benefits of this super fruit.

Introducing the Pomegranate
Pomegranates are one of the oldest known fruits in the world and feature in ancient literary works of many cultures and religions. It’s a red fruit, with a hard outer skin housing a series of red seeds which can be eaten or juiced. They have a long shelf life and can last for up to two months in the fridge as long as they are covered but most importantly of all, they are absolutely packed with nutrients. Pomegranates have been revered by many cultures as a symbol of health, fertility and life; and now modern research suggests that this reputation is deserved.

Recent Studies
Mice who were genetically prone to sudden artery blockages were provided with pomegranate juice via their drinking water over a period of two weeks. Although the treatment was found to increase cholesterol levels associated with artery blockage initially, it noticeably reduced the size of the harmful build ups in the aortic sinus, an opening above the aortic valve which lets blood exit the heart. It was also shown to reduce the number of coronary arteries that had accumulated the plaques and blockages that cause heart problems.

Further research suggests that Punicalagin, a compound found in pomegranates, can not only lower both cholesterol and blood pressure levels, but also help increase the speed at which blockages of the arteries melt away. Blockages can therefore be removed before they harden and grow.

In another study, patients with severe carotid artery blockages drank pomegranate juice every day for a year. The results were remarkable – showing a 12% average reduction in blood pressure across the study’s participants, along with a 30% reduction in plaque build up in the arteries. Patients who did not participate in the test saw their plaque levels rise by 9% over the same period.

Discussion
There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that pomegranates really can have a significant impact upon blockages in your arteries and in doing so reduce your susceptibility to a heart attack. Experts recommend that you add them to your regular diet to strengthen your body’s own defenses against heart disease. Their benefits are not confined to their ability to help clear your arteries. Evidence based research has suggested that their value to heart health is broad:
They can help lower blood pressure.
They are strong anti-inflammatories.
They are one of the most potent anti-oxidants found among fruit, helping protect the body against cell damage.
They are anti-infective.