Philosophy of Charles Schultz

The following is the philosophy of Charles Schultz , the creator of the “Peanuts” comic strip.
You don’t have to actually answer the questions. Just read the “entire” post straight through, and you’ll get the point.
1. Name the five wealthiest people in the world.

2. Name the last five Heisman trophy winners.

3. Name the last five winners of the Miss America Contest.

4. Name ten people who have won the Nobel or Pulitzer Prize.

5. Name the last half dozen Academy Award winners for best actor and actress.

6. Name the last decade’s worth of World Series winners.

How did you do?

The point is, none of us remember the headliners of yesterday. They are not second-rate achievers. They are the best in their fields. But the applause dies. Awards tarnish. Achievements are forgotten. Accolades and certificates are buried with their owners.

Here’s another quiz. See how you do on this one:

1. List a few teachers who aided your journey through school.

2. Name three friends who have helped you through a difficult time.

3. Name five people who have taught you something worthwhile.

4. Think of a few people who have made you feel appreciated and special.

5. Think of five people you enjoy spending time with.

Easier?

* The lesson: The people who make a difference in your life are NOT the ones with the most credentials, the most money, or the most awards. “They are the ones who care.”

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Parents – Inspiring Story

A conversation. …this was narrated by an IAF pilot to IIT students on Special seminar for HUMAN RELATION.

 My parents left for our native place on Thursday and we went to the airport to see them off. In fact, my father had never traveled by air before, so I just took this opportunity to make him experience the same. In spite of being asked to book tickets by train, I got them tickets on Jet Airways. The moment I handed over the tickets to him, he was surprised to see that I had booked them by air. The excitement was very apparent on his face, waiting for the time of travel. Just like a school boy, he was preparing himself on that day and we all went to the airport, right from using the trolley for his luggage, the baggage check-in and asking for window seat and waiting restlessly for the security check-in to happen. He was thoroughly enjoying himself and I, too, was overcome with joy watching him experience all these things. As they were about to go in for the security check-in, he walked up to me with tears in his eyes and thanked me. He became very emotional and it ! was not as if I had done something great but the fact that this meant a great deal to him.  When he said thanks, I told him there was no need to thank me. But later, thinking about the entire incident, I looked back at my life. As a child how many dreams our parents have made come true. Without understanding the financial situation, we ask for cricket bats, dresses, toys, outings, etc.

 Irrespective of their affordability, they have catered to all our needs. Did we ever think about the sacrifices they had to make to accommodate many of our wishes? Did we ever say thanks for all that they have done for us?

Same way, today when it comes to our children, we always think that we should put them in a good school. Regardless of the amount of donation, we will ensure that we will have to give the child the best, theme parks, toys, etc. But we tend to forget that our parents have sacrificed a lot for our sake to see us happy, so it is our responsibility to ensure that their dreams are realized and what they failed to see when they were young, it is our responsibility to ensure that they experience all those and their life  is complete. Many times, when my parents had asked me some questions, I have actually answered back without patience. When my daughter asks me something, I have been very polite in answering. Now I realize how they would have felt at those moments. Let us realize that old age is a second childhood and just as we take care of our children, the same attention and same care need to be given to our parents and elders. Rather than my dad saying thank you to me, I would want to say sorry for making him wait so long for this small dream. I do realize how much he has sacrificed for my sake and I will do my best to give the best possible attention to all their wishes. Just because they are old does not mean that they will have to give up everything and keep sacrificing for their grandchildren also. They have wishes, too.

 Take care of your parents.

My Mother's Eight Lies – Inspiring Story

1. This story begins when I was a child.  I was born the son of a poor family. We often lacked enough food.  When it was time to eat, mother often gave me her share, saying, “Eat this rice, son.  I’m not hungry.”

 That was Mother’s First Lie

 

2. When I was growing up, my persistent mother would fish in a river near our home.  She hoped to catch fish that would give me more nutrition than rice. She would make fish soup from those she caught.  I always had an appetite for it.  While I was eating my soup, mother would sit by my side and nibble on the small pieces of fish remaining on the bones.  My heart was touched.  When I tried to give her some of my fish, she would refuse, saying “Eat the fish, son.  I really don’t like them.”

 That was Mother’s Second Lie.

 

3. Then, when I was in Junior High School, to pay for my school costs, Mother would find small jobs to earn money to pay for them, and to provide for our needs.  When winter came, and I would go to bed earlier, I’d waken from my sleep to see my Mother still working on the small projects that earned the money we needed.  I’d say, “Mother, go to sleep.  It’s late. Tomorrow morning you still must go for more work.  You need to rest.”  Mother would smile and say, “Go to sleep, dear.  I’m not tired.”

 That was Mother’s Third Lie.

 

4. At the time of my final term in school, Mother asked for a leave from her work in order to accompany me when I took my final tests. She stood in the heat of the sun, patient as always, waiting for the bell to ring signalling that the tests were over.  Mother immediately welcomed me, pouring me a cold glass of tea that she had prepared the evening before. I would say, though, that the tea wasn’t as sweet as my Mother’s love.  Seeing her covered with persperation, I’d offer her my tea to drink.  She’d say, “Drink, son; I am not thirsty!”

 That was Mother’s Fourth Lie.

 

5. After my father died because of a long illness, my poor mother had to play her role as a single parent. By holding onto her only job, she paid for our needs alone. Father”s death made our life more complicated. There were no times when we had no problems.  There was a nice uncle who lived nearby who helped when he could.  Our neighbors saw that our family’s life was miserable, and suggested that mother remarry.  But she was stubbofrn and said, “I don’t need love.”

 That was Mother’s Fifth Lie.

 6. After I had finished my study and got a job, it was time for my mother to retire. But she didn’t want to.  She was persistent to go to the marketplace every morning, just to sell some vegetable to fulfill our needs. I, who worked in the other city, often sent her some money to help; but she was stubborn and wouldn’t accept the money. She even sent it back to me. She said, “I have enough money.”

 That was Mother’s Sixth Lie.

  7. After I graduated from university with my Bachelor Degree, I continued my studies to earn my Master Degree. My studies were funded by a company that had a scholarship program. The degree was from a famous university in America. After my degree, I began working for that company, receiving quite a large salary.  I intended to bring my mother to enjoy her remaining life in America . But my lovely mother didn’t want to bother her son.  She said to me. “I am not used to change. Thank you, no!”

 That was Mother’s Seventh Lie.

 

8. After entering old age, Mother got cancer and had to be hospitalized. Though I was miles and an ocean away, I returned home to be with my Mother.  She had an operation that left her weak. She looked so old and tired.  Even though she was, she tried to smile and show her love for me. It was clear to me that even smiling was difficult because of the pain. Her body was so ravaged by the cancer.  She was weak and thin.

 I looked at my Mother with tears streaming down my cheeks.  My heart was so broken seeing her in her sad condition. But my dearest Mother, despite her impossible condition said so lovingly to me, “Don’t cry, my dear.  I am not in pain.”

 That was Mother’s Eighth Lie.